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Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre. Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre. Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre. Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre. Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre. Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre.

Various photos from the New York Auto Show, or, how a madhouse of forklifts and crates turns into a temporary car museum / theatre.

therumbling:

WANT! (via iOS ‘86 - Anton Repponen & via)

therumbling:

WANT! (via iOS ‘86 - Anton Repponen & via)

Experience Design can encompass a lot of things, but at the core you might say it’s about crafting a feeling. If your canvas for experience design is, say, a bridge, and you want to ignite the senses of one laying eyes on that bridge, you might shoot for “awe” as a feeling to engender. But that is a bit overdone, no?
The city of Trenton agreed when, in 1935, they designed the ultimate (and probably only) feeling of passive aggression ever to come from a bridge. The city inverted a phrase coined by state senator S. Roy Heath when they slapped on the side of the Lower Trenton Bridge for all the world to see: “TRENTON MAKES    THE WORLD TAKES”
Spaced out just as it is here, with a few beats between “MAKES” and “THE” for dramatic (contemptuous?) effect*, and illuminated every evening, it was perhaps not the most forward thinking phrase for the city to adopt. Nonetheless it is still there; the words’ back turned to passing motorists escaping the city with loads of Trenton-built… well, we won’t rub it in. We know what it’s like to come from a former manufacturing hub.
Suffice to say, Trenton, that’s one unique example of experience design you’ve got going there.
Listen to more about the Lower Trenton Bridge here.
*Or, likely, out of engineering necessity…

Experience Design can encompass a lot of things, but at the core you might say it’s about crafting a feeling. If your canvas for experience design is, say, a bridge, and you want to ignite the senses of one laying eyes on that bridge, you might shoot for “awe” as a feeling to engender. But that is a bit overdone, no?

The city of Trenton agreed when, in 1935, they designed the ultimate (and probably only) feeling of passive aggression ever to come from a bridge. The city inverted a phrase coined by state senator S. Roy Heath when they slapped on the side of the Lower Trenton Bridge for all the world to see: “TRENTON MAKES    THE WORLD TAKES”

Spaced out just as it is here, with a few beats between “MAKES” and “THE” for dramatic (contemptuous?) effect*, and illuminated every evening, it was perhaps not the most forward thinking phrase for the city to adopt. Nonetheless it is still there; the words’ back turned to passing motorists escaping the city with loads of Trenton-built… well, we won’t rub it in. We know what it’s like to come from a former manufacturing hub.

Suffice to say, Trenton, that’s one unique example of experience design you’ve got going there.

Listen to more about the Lower Trenton Bridge here.

*Or, likely, out of engineering necessity…

Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).
You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”
This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.
Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82. Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).
You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”
This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.
Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82. Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).
You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”
This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.
Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82. Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).
You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”
This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.
Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82. Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).
You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”
This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.
Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82.

Ralph McQuarrie went from drawing dental equipment to designing Darth Vader, AT-ATs, and the rebel base on Hoth. These, of course, are iconic pieces of the Star Wars universe. Hired by George Lucas to do concept art for Episode IV, McQuarrie breathed life into Lucas’ script (which we all know to be fairly lifeless).

You can find this on McQuarrie’s Wikipedia page, but I liked the quote so much I wanted to repeat it here: “Christian Blauvelt of Entertainment Weekly praised McQuarrie’s works as ‘pioneering of the “used future” aesthetic which unlike other science-fiction, ‘imagined a lived-in galaxy that was gritty, dirty, and in advance states of decay.”

This concept was the forefather to the film-noir, grungy aesthetic of later works like Blade Runner and what I would consider, thus far, the pinacle of “retro-futurism,” the Fallout video game series.

Ralph McQuarrie died March 3rd at the age of 82.

(Source: conceptships.blogspot.com)

Today is only Tuesday, indeed. This is quite a GIF.
deathanddumb:

katalepsja-off-duty:

I can’t stop looking at this thing, help…

I could watch this for ages and ages and ages. It’s so nice. On and on and on and on. Today is only Tuesday…

Today is only Tuesday, indeed. This is quite a GIF.

deathanddumb:

katalepsja-off-duty:

I can’t stop looking at this thing, help…

I could watch this for ages and ages and ages. It’s so nice. On and on and on and on. Today is only Tuesday…

(Source: ursevendevils, via 254forest)


“Euthanasia Coaster” is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being. Riding the coaster’s track, the rider is subjected to a series of intensive motion elements that induce various unique experiences: from euphoria to thrill, and from tunnel vision to loss of consciousness, and, eventually, death. Thanks to the marriage of the advanced cross-disciplinary research in space medicine, mechanical engineering, material technologies and, of course, gravity, the fatal journey is made pleasing, elegant and meaningful. Celebrating the limits of the human body but also the liberation from the horizontal life, this ‘kinetic sculpture’ is in fact the ultimate roller coaster: John Allen, former president of the famed Philadelphia Toboggan Company, once sad that “the ultimate roller coaster is built when you send out twenty-four people and they all come back dead. This could be done, you know.”
Designed by Julijona Urbonas

“Euthanasia Coaster” is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being. Riding the coaster’s track, the rider is subjected to a series of intensive motion elements that induce various unique experiences: from euphoria to thrill, and from tunnel vision to loss of consciousness, and, eventually, death. Thanks to the marriage of the advanced cross-disciplinary research in space medicine, mechanical engineering, material technologies and, of course, gravity, the fatal journey is made pleasing, elegant and meaningful. Celebrating the limits of the human body but also the liberation from the horizontal life, this ‘kinetic sculpture’ is in fact the ultimate roller coaster: John Allen, former president of the famed Philadelphia Toboggan Company, once sad that “the ultimate roller coaster is built when you send out twenty-four people and they all come back dead. This could be done, you know.”
Designed by Julijona Urbonas

“Euthanasia Coaster” is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being. Riding the coaster’s track, the rider is subjected to a series of intensive motion elements that induce various unique experiences: from euphoria to thrill, and from tunnel vision to loss of consciousness, and, eventually, death. Thanks to the marriage of the advanced cross-disciplinary research in space medicine, mechanical engineering, material technologies and, of course, gravity, the fatal journey is made pleasing, elegant and meaningful. Celebrating the limits of the human body but also the liberation from the horizontal life, this ‘kinetic sculpture’ is in fact the ultimate roller coaster: John Allen, former president of the famed Philadelphia Toboggan Company, once sad that “the ultimate roller coaster is built when you send out twenty-four people and they all come back dead. This could be done, you know.”
Designed by Julijona Urbonas

“Euthanasia Coaster” is a hypothetic euthanasia machine in the form of a roller coaster, engineered to humanely – with elegance and euphoria – take the life of a human being. Riding the coaster’s track, the rider is subjected to a series of intensive motion elements that induce various unique experiences: from euphoria to thrill, and from tunnel vision to loss of consciousness, and, eventually, death. Thanks to the marriage of the advanced cross-disciplinary research in space medicine, mechanical engineering, material technologies and, of course, gravity, the fatal journey is made pleasing, elegant and meaningful. Celebrating the limits of the human body but also the liberation from the horizontal life, this ‘kinetic sculpture’ is in fact the ultimate roller coaster: John Allen, former president of the famed Philadelphia Toboggan Company, once sad that “the ultimate roller coaster is built when you send out twenty-four people and they all come back dead. This could be done, you know.”

Designed by Julijona Urbonas

I made mention of these little buggers yesterday, but it’s worth bringing them up one more time given that they’ve mastered the James Bond theme in the last 24 hours.

Drill Inc. is a Japanese advertising agency that has created this epic, wooden, instrument. It plays a 144-foot rendition of Bach’s Cantana 147 to support NTT DOCOMO’s launch of the “Touch Wood” mobile phone. It’s quite elegant, and quite beautiful.

Do take a look at Drill Inc.’s website, too, which is, ah, refreshingly lo-fi.

(Source: ted.com)

A trailer for Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus,” presented in the guise of a TED Talk from 2023. Guy Pearce takes us off-world. Finally.

(Source: blog.ted.com)

Ping Pong ball + Friday + Fire = …

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